Dr Sofia Stolk

Senior researcher

  • Department:
    Researchers
  • Research strand: Public interest(s) inside/within international and European institutions and their practices
  • Main fields of interest: International Criminal Law International Dispute Settlement International Humanitarian Law International Legal Theory Law and Society Studies Philosophy of Law Public International Law Transnational Legal Relations Visualisation of International Law

Profile

Dr Sofia Stolk is a senior researcher in international law at the Asser Institute in The Hague and the University of Amsterdam. Her research project 'Imagining Justice' focuses on the use of visual means by international courts and tribunals and explores how different audiences engage with international law through its representation in visual media. She has taught and published internationally about the intersection of international law and art, architecture, theater, and film. Her monograph ‘The Opening Statement of the Prosecution in International Criminal Trials: A Solemn Tale of Horror’ was published by Routledge in 2021. She is currently editor for the International Legal Theory section of the Leiden Journal of International Law.

Together with Renske Vos (VU Amsterdam), Sofia founded the Legal Sightseeing platform (www.legalsightseeing.org).

Sofia also works for the Movies that Matter Foundation and coordinates, amongst other things, the Camera Justitia program on law and social justice at the annual Movies that Matter film festival in The Hague.

 

Publications

Key Publications

  • S. Stolk, The Opening Statement of the Prosecution in International Criminal Trials: A Solemn Tale of Horror (Routledge 2021).
  • S. Stolk and R. Vos, ‘Courtroom 600: The (Virtual) Reality of Being There’, International Criminal Law Review 22.1-2 (2021): 308-327.
  • S. Stolk and R. Vos (eds.) International Law’s Collected Stories (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020).
  • T.E. Aalberts and S. Stolk, 'The Peace Palace: Building (of) The International Community' AJIL Unbound (2020) 114, 117-122. 
  • S. Stolk and W.G. Werner, ‘Moving Images: Modes of Representation and Images of Victimhood in Audio-Visual Productions', in: Kevin Jon Heller, Jens Ohlin, Sarah Nouwen, Frederic Mégret and Darryl Robinson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of International Criminal Law (Oxford: Oxford University Press 2020).
  • S. Stolk and R. Vos, ‘Law in concrete: institutional architecture in Brussels and The Hague’, 14(1) Law and Humanities (2020) 57-82.
  • L.J.M. Boer and S. Stolk (eds.), Backstage Practices of Transnational Law (Routledge, 2019).
  • S. Stolk, ‘A Sophisticated Beast? On the Construction of an ‘Ideal’ Perpetrator in the Opening Statements of International Criminal Trials’, 29(3) European Journal of International Law (2018).
  • S. Stolk, ‘Imagining Scenes of Mass Atrocity from Afar: Maps and Landscapes at the International Criminal Court’, 5(3) London Review of International Law (2017) 425-451.
  • Sofia Stolk, ‘A Sophisticated Beast? On the Construction of an “Ideal” Perpetrator in the Opening Statements of International Criminal Trials’, European Journal of International Law 29 (2018): 677–701.
  • Sofia Stolk and Renske Vos, 'International Legal Sightseeing', Journal of the Oxford Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, issue 2 (2018)
  • Sofia Stolk, ‘“Cruel Men Can Do Kind Things and Kind Men Can Do Cruel Things”: Reconsidering the
    Enemy of Humanity in Contemporary International Criminal Trial Discourse’, 47(2) Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy (2018): 149-157.
  • Sofia Stolk, ‘Imagining Scenes of Mass Atrocity from Afar: Maps and Landscapes at the International Criminal Court’, 5(3) London Review of International Law (2017): 425-451.
  • Jillian Dobson and Sofia Stolk ‘The Prosecutor’s important announcements; the communication of moral authority at the International Criminal Court’, Law, Culture and the Humanities (2016), DOI: 10.1177/1743872116666466.
  • Sofia Stolk, ‘The Victim, the International Criminal Court and the Search for Truth: On the Interdependence and Incompatibility of Truths about Mass Atrocity’, 13(5) Journal for International Criminal Justice(2015): 973-994
  • Sofia Stolk, ‘“The Records on Which History Will Judge Us Tomorrow”: Auto-History in the Opening Statements of International Criminal Trials’, 28(4) Leiden Journal of International Law (2015): 993-1012.